When Debt Collectors Go Bad

Make no mistake, breaking the law when collecting on a debt can be lucrative for debt collectors. They can say or do illegal things that get people to pay when those people otherwise would not pay. I've had people skip cardiologist appointments just to have the money to pay old debts. I've seen people skip filling up their propane tank just because they were more scared of the debt collector than freezing in their own home.

Imagine filing your tax return and learning you are going to get refund of over a thousand dollars. And that the refund will finally allow you to catch up on your bills bring the utility bill up to date, pay off than payday loan, and pay off the dentist bill for your kid's cavity. That is a pretty good feeling. Now imagine that two weeks after you send in that tax return you get a phone call on a debt that you are not even sure is yours because your ex was supposed to pay off that debt when you got divorced. Now imagine the debt collector says if you do not pay this debt right now, we will take all of your tax returns. Well, here is the problem: a debt collector can never take your federal tax return (unless you owe certain debts like tax debts or child support, etc.) and if they have never sued you, or never won a lawsuit, and have no way to garnish any accounts of yours. But most people don't know that the debt collector broke the law when getting that person to fork over some money.

We sue debt collectors in state and federal courts for violating the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, the Electronic Funds Transfer Act, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, the Michigan Collection Practices Act, and the Michigan Occupation Code.

When debt collectors break the law, we can hold them accountable.
Here is a short list of the most common violations we see:

  • Contacting other people about your debt.
  • Calling after 9:00 pm or before 8:00 am.
  • Calling you at work after you told them not to.
  • Calling at a time or pace you have told them is inconvenient.
  • Telling you they are going to garnish your accounts when they have do not have a judgment against you.
  • Telling you they are going to take your personal or real property when they have do not have a judgment against you.
  • Telling you they are going to garnish your take your tax returns when they have do not have a judgment against you.
  • Threatening to harm you.
  • Threatening to have you arrested.
  • Contacting you after you have told them you to stop.
  • Contacting you after you have told them you have an attorney representing you.
  • Threatening to sue you when they have no intention or ability to sue you.

Contact our office today for a free consultation to find out how we can stop abusive debt collectors in their tracks.

Thomas Golden

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Lowell, Michigan

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